Change of Scenery

Well as it happens I’m currently on loan to the Philadelphia office while a couple of the boats I am normally on under go shipyard periods. As luck would have it they needed some extra help down here so last week I took a slightly longer drive than normal for a change in scenery.
Things in Philly are a bit different than New York or Boston. For one the Port encompasses all manners of docks and terminals spread up and down the Delaware river. So occasionally we are steaming a couple hours one way to dock or undock a ship or tug and barge only to have to turn around and come back. More often than not a tug will be kept farther down river to avoid that steaming time and fuel burn, however when we get swamped it happens.
Another change is that they don’t do nearly as much barge work here as New York, and thusly are really concentrated on ship docking and assist. Which brings me to the best difference; most of their tugs are tractors. For those that don’t know what a tractor tug is, or what they can do, check this video out. Thats from onboard some the tractors of G&H towing in Texas who employees more than few former class mates of mine. Its that kind of video that has made me always want to try my hand at ship work on a tractor tug. I got a small introduction to them during my last internship at Foss Boston, and have quite a bit of z-drive supply boat experience, but this is definitely a new ball game. The boat I am on is a compact powerhouse and very handy, really a blast to get acclimated at running a tractor on.
I could go on and on about it, but hopefully I’ll have some video at some point to show things from the wheelhouse. For now here are some photos from the past week and a half.

Reid McAllister at the McAllister Philly yard

Reid McAllister at the McAllister Philly yard

Capt Charlie O' Brian at work, getting ready to pull a ship out of dry dock.

Capt Charlie O’ Brian at work, getting ready to pull a ship out of dry dock.

Alex McAllister, formerly the Winslow Kelsey and one of the earliest tractors on the east coast

Alex McAllister, formerly the Winslow Kelsey and one of the earliest tractors on the east coast

The Alex

The Alex

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DSC_9379 2

James R. Moran

James R. Moran

The Timothy

The Timothy

from the back deck

from the back deck

hovering all stop

hovering all stop

Timothy McAllister putting up their line.

Timothy McAllister putting up their line.

Leanin' into it

Leanin’ into it

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When its Good its Good

If you want another glimpse into the mariner’s lifestyle, from an engineer’s perspective, check out this post from another Maine Maritime Alumni.

When It’s Good, It’s Good

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Deepwater Wind

Big Breaking news for a several New England companies involved with supporting the Deepwater Wind project off Block Island. 

Rhode Island Fast Ferry has been awarded a charter for support vessels for the field and Blount Shipbuilding has been awarded the contract to build the first wind farm support vessel in the United States! 

More information can be found here

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Photo of the Week 5-11-15

Something from someone other than myself this week! This simply fantastic photo comes from a classmate and friend Bryan Hammond, a mate on the tug Liberty Service. He’s a talented photographer and a great boatman, another real New England Waterman. If you like the below photo feel free to check out more of his work here

Craig Eric Reinauer and her attending ladies of Boston Harbor. The Justice, Liberty, and Freedom

Craig Eric Reinauer and her attending ladies of Boston Harbor. The Justice, Liberty, and Freedom

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Looking for work?

Lately I have been getting a lot of emails and messages from soon to be maritime grads, and recent G.O.M. lay off victims, all looking for tips on where and how to find a job. So here are my top three tips on how to land that first, or second, or twenty-third job in the maritime industry.

Number Three:
Check your email regularly, including the spam folder. Always keep your phone on and on you, and always answer.

Number Two:
Keep all of your documents organized and in a folder for any potential interview. Also, and even more important, keep them all saved electronically as emailable PDF files.

Number One:
Endlessly emailing companies is a waste of time, and honestly, for the lazy. Pick up the phone and start dialing. Get anyone at in the office on the phone that you can! Be polite, and if you aren’t talking to the right person, ask nicely if you can be directed to the right person! Just get on the PHONE! If I didn’t make it clear enough, here is Leonardo Dicaprio to help clarify.

If you are a newbie who wants to get into the industry, and don’t know where to start. Feel free to send me a message.

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Artsy Shots

Here a few shots from the last hitch that will be destined for my eventual coffee table book of tugboat “art”

Yes I know, the black and white is artsy cliche

All in a row

All in a row

Reflections

Reflections

Training Wheels

Training Wheels

Weatherbound

Weatherbound

The Old Man

The Old Man

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Buy my boat!

Safari is still for sale folks! I will be taking the winter cover off soon and cleaning her up for those interested in seeing her! Check out her page on here or look at a few of the photos below. Feel free to contact me at sailorbytrade@gmail.com with any questions!

boat girl, boat dog, and the waterman

boat girl, boat dog, and the waterman

moving along

moving along

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a little mood lighting

a little mood lighting

Hard to beat

Hard to beat

photo (29)

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